THANK YOU FOR VISITING LIBERTY IMMIGRATION AND BAIL BONDS


CALL 817-759-2663 FOR FAST, EFFICIENT, FRIENDLY SERVICE

 

CALL LIBERTY IMMIGRATION BONDS AS SOON AS YOU KNOW THAT YOUR FAMILY MEMBER OR FRIEND HAS BEEN DETAINED. THE SOONER WE GET STARTED ON THE CASE, THE SOONER YOUR LOVED ONE CAN BE RELEASED.


 

INFORMATION NECESSARY TO BOND CLIENT:

 

  • ALIENS FULL NAME

  • ALIENS HOME ADDRESS

  • ALIENS DATE OF BIRTH

  • ALIENS COUNTRY OF BIRTH

  • FACILITY BEING HELD (OR AREA WHERE ALIEN WAS DETAINED)

  • NAME OF PERSON POSTING THE BOND

  • VALID SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER FOR THE PERSON CONSIGNING AND REQUESTING THE BOND POSTING

  • VALID PHONE NUMBER AND ADDRESS OF PERSON POSTING THE BOND

  • ACCEPTABLE FORMS OF IDENTIFICATION FOR CO-SIGNER'S.

 

  • PERMANENT RESIDENT CARD-GREEN CARD

  • PASSPORT WITH APPROPRIATE

  • STAMPS

  • VALID STATE DRIVER'S LICENSE

  • STATE ID WITH PROOF OF IMMIGRATION STATUS

ALIEN REGISTRATION NUMBER: THE ALIEN REGISTRATION

NUMBER IS THE NUMBER ASSIGNED TO THE ALIEN AT TIME OF DETENTION. IT IS ALSO CALLED THE "A" NUMBER.

THIS NUMBER IS VERY HELPFUL IN LOCATING SOMEONE AND

IS REQUIRED WHEN BONDING THE ALIEN.

 

LOCATING AND BONDING YOUR LOVED ONE DEPENDS

ON A NUMBER OF FACTORS. WE USE ALL OF YOUR EXPERTISE

AND RESOURCES TO LOCATE AND BOND YOUR FAMILY

MEMBER/FRIEND AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE. WE KNOW THAT YOUR LOVED ONE IS A VALUABLE MEMBER OF YOUR

COMMUNITY AND WE STRIVE TO HELP YOU IN ANYWAY POSSIBLE.

 

THE FEE FOR POSTING AN IMMIGRATION BOND IS 12% OF THE AMOUNT OF THE BOND PLUS COLLATERAL.

EACH BOND IS CALCULATED ON A CASE BY CASE BASIS.

 

JUST TAKE A DEEP BREATH AND RELAX. LIBERTY IS HERE TO HELP YOU OBTAIN RELEASE OF YOUR LOVED ONE FROM CUSTODY AS QUICKLY AS POSSIBLE. WE KNOW WHERE TO TURN, WE CAN HELP YOU LOCATE YOUR LOVED ONE AND GUIDE THROUGH THE PROCESS OF RELEASE FROM IMMIGRATION CUSTODY.

 

 

 

STEPS TO RELEASE FROM

IMMIGRATION DETENTION

ALIEN IS DETAINED BY ICE

ICE SETS BOND OR

REVISES BOND AMOUNT

OR

JUDGE SETS BOND OR

REVISES BOND AMOUNT

FAMILY OR FRIENDS

CALL LIBERTY IMMIGRATION BONDS

AFTER A FEW SIMPLE QUESTIONS AND

A REASONABLE AND COMPETITIVE FEE

LIBERTY IMMIGRATION BONDS WILL POST

THE REQUIRED BOND FOR YOU

ALIEN IS RELEASED FROM CUSTODY

 

 

LIBERTY IMMIGRATION AND BAIL BONDS

ICE BAIL BONDS 817-759-2663

 

CALL IMMEDIATELY UPON LEARNING OF

DETAINMENT TO FIND OUT YOUR OPTIONS

 

Find Texas Immigration Office by District Below:

 

Location 1:

Dallas Immigration ICE District Office

101 North Stemmons Freeway

Dallas, TX 75247

Serving the following counties:

Anderson, Andrews, Archer, Armstrong, Bailey, Baylor,

Borden, Bosque, Bowie, Briscoe, Callahan, Camp, Carson,

Cass, Castro, Cherokee, Childress, Clay, Cochran, Collin,

Collingsworth, Comanche, Cooke, Cottle, Crosby, Dallam,

Dallas, Dawson, Def Smith, Delta, Denton, Dickens,

Donley, Eastland, Ellis, Erath, Fanning, Fisher Floyd,

Foard, Franklin, Freestone, Gains, Gara, Gray, Grayson,

Gregg, Hale, Hall, Hamilton, Hansford, Hardeman, Harison,

Hartley, Haskell, Hemphill, Henderson, Hill, Hockley, Hood,

Hopkins, Houston Howard, Hunt, Hutchinson, jack

Johnson, Jones, Kaufman, Kent, king, Knox, Lamar, Lamb,

Leon, Limestone, Lipscomb, Lubbock, Lynn, Marion,

Martin, Mitchell, Montague, Moore, Morris, Motley,

Navarro, Nolan, Ochiltree, Oldham, Palo Pinto, Panola,

Parker, Parmer, Potter, Rains, Randall, Red River, Roberts,

Rockwall, Rusk, Scurry, Shackelford, Sherman, Smith,

Somervell, Stephens, Stonewall, Swisher, Tarrant, Taylor,

Terry, Throckmorton, Titus, Upshur, Van Zandt, Wheeler,

Wichita, Willbarger, Wise, Wood, Yoakum, and Young

 

Location 2:

El Paso Immigration ICE District Office

1545 Hawkins Boulevard, Suite 167

El Paso, TX 79925

Service areas:

The state of New Mexico and the following counties in

Texas: El Paso, Brewster, Crane, Culberson, Ector,

Hudspeth, Jeff Davis, Loving, Midland, Pecos, Presidio,

Reeves, Terrell, Upton, Ward, and Winkler.

 

Location 3:

Harlingen US Customs and Immigration District Office

1717 Zoy Street

Harlingen, TX 78552

Serves the following counties:

Brooks, Cameron, Hidalgo, Kennedy, Kleberg, Starr, and Willacy

 

Location 4:

Houston Immigration ICE District Office

126 Northpoint

Houston, TX 77060

Serves the following counties:

Angelina, Austin, Brazoria, Chambers, Colorado, Fort Bend,

Galveston, Grimes, Hardin, Harris, jasper, Jefferson, Liberty,

Madison, Matagorda, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Newton,

Orange, Polk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, Shelby,

Trinity, Tyler, Walker, Waller, Washington (except for naturalization)

and Wharton

 

Location 5:

San Antonio Immigration District Office

8940 Fourwinds Drive

San Antonio, TX 78239

Servers the following counties:

78 counties of Central and South Texas, which include the

following major cities: San Antonio, Austin, Waco San

Angelo, College Station/Bryan, Victoria, Corpus Christi,

Kerrville, Uvalde, Del Rio, Eagle Pass and Laredo

Enforcement and Removal Operations Leadership

  • Field office Director: Enrique M. Lucero

  • Facility Assistant Field Office director: Michael A. Watkins

  • Facility Main Telephone Line: (956) 547-1700

  • Field Office Main telephone Line: (210) 283-4750

Finding the Status of a Case

 

Immigration Court

 

For information about a matter before the immigration court, you may call 1-800-898-7180 to speak

with them directly. Applications for relief from removal, and other applications requested by the

immigration judge must be filed directly with the immigration court.

 

Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA)

 

for information about a matter before the Board of Immigration Appeals (BIA), you may call

(703) 605-1007 where you can obtain automated information or speak with a live representative during office hours

 

 

How Do Immigration Bonds Work?

 

If your family member or friend has been detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE),

do not assume that they will be departed and do not lose hope. You may be entitled to an Immigration

Bond. Getting someone released from an immigration detention facility is a complicated matter.

Nevertheless, If your loved one is in ICE detention there is a process to possibly obtaining release

from custody until there case is heard. The information in this website is meant to help provide

you with the knowledge required to navigate the immigration system. Of course, because

everyone's cases vary it is advisable to discuss your situation with an experienced immigration

attorney to make the best of the situation.

 

TWO TYPES OF IMMIGRATION BONDS:

  1. Delivery Bond: This bond is the insurance to the government that the individual will

    appear for their court hearings. Before this bond can be posted an individual will be

    issued a notice of Custody Conditions and a Warrant of Arrest. Not everyone will be

    able to post a delivery bond. If the individual does not appear in court the bond will

    be forfeited.

  2. Voluntary Departure Bond: The individual agrees to leave the country at their own

    expense within a certain time period.

    If they do not leave the country the bond will be forfeited and more legal problems

    will ensue.

ICE WILL SET BOND: If while being detained you are eligible for bond, the government

will set the bond amount. You may post this bond in cash and after all court hearings have

been attended by the individual, the amount will be returned to you. If however, you can

not afford the entire amount of the bond, an immigration bondsman can pay this amount

for you after you pay the bondsman a nonrefundable fee. If the individual attends all

court hearings and the case is disposed, you will not owe any further amount. However,

if the individual fails to go to court, for any reason, you will owe the entire amount of the

bond to the immigration bondsman.

 

BOND HEARING: There are two factors that will affect the judges decision when deciding bond:

  1. Is the individual a flight risk or is it likely that the individual will not attend all

    of his court dates.

  2. Is the individual a threat to the community.

    Any other factors, such as a removable offense, that would make the individual

    ineligible for an immigration bond.

At the bond hearing it is important to present as much evidence as possible about the

individual's life that would determine him to be a responsible person. These would

include:

  1. Apartment lease or mortgage-to show you have somewhere to live.

  2. Letters from employers and pay subs-indicating you have a job.

  3. Marriage Certificate-to indicate you have family to care for (only if your

    spouse is a US citizen or lawful resident)

  4. Children's Birth Certificates-Only if children are US citizens or legal resident

  5. Relatives in Court-to show the judge that you have family that cares about you.

  6. Letters of Support-Get notarized letters from family, friends, neighbors, coworkers

    and clergy stating that you are a good and reliable person.

  7. School Records-including GED

  8. Tax Records-The judge expects that people who have lived and worked in the United

    States have paid their taxes.

  9. Past Criminal History-to show the judge that you appeared in court as required on past case.

  10. Attendance in Rehabilitation Programs-to show the judge that you are trying to fix your

    drug, alcohol or anger problems.

NOTICE TO APPEAR (NTA):

 

This is the document that is given to you and the court by the United States government that explains

why you should be removed from the United States. This starts the case against you and must be

given to you by ICE within 72 hours of detention. The first part of the NTA is called "ALLEGATIONS"

and contains your name, the country you are from, and the date and manner by which you entered

the United States. This gives the factual basis or reason for your removal. The "CHARGES",

which is the second part of the document, lists the sections of law under which you may be

removed. Look at this document carefully and be sure that it contains accurate information such,

as your correct name, date you entered the United States and does it correctly state any criminal

convictions. A mistake in any of these facts could make a difference being held in detention and

receiving a bond.

 

DETERMINING WHETHER YOU ARE REMOVABLE:

 

Deport ability V. Inadmissibility:

 

Non-citizens can be removed from the United States under the Immigration and Nationality

Act, if they violate the statutory grounds of either "inadmissibility" or "deport ability".

"Inadmissibility" grounds apply to those who make an initial application to enter the United

States lawfully, travel abroad as a lawful permanent resident and get stopped by immigration on trying

to reenter the country or are in the United States and make an application for legal status. The

"deportability" grounds apply to people who have been legally admitted into the US as a lawful

permanent resident or visitor.

 

CRIMINAL GROUNDS OF DEPORTABILITY

 

If you have been convicted of any of the following crimes, you may be subject to removal on

deportability grounds :

  1. An aggravated felony

  2. A crime involving moral turpitude (CIMT) committed within five years of the

    date of your admission and for which a sentence of one year or longer may be imposed

  3. Two "CIMY"s at any time after your admission

  4. A controlled substance offense (other than single offense of possession for one's

    personal use of 30 grams or less of marijuana)

  5. Certain firearms offenses

  6. A domestic violence crime including violation of an order of protection

CRIMINAL GROUNDS OF INADMISSIBILITY

 

If you entered the US without inspection (EWD and / or admitted to or were convicted of

any of the following crimes, you may be subject to removal on inadmissibility grounds:

  1. A controlled substance offense

  2. Moral turpitude (CIMT) subject to the petty offense exception

There are two exceptions to the above crimes:

  1. Petty Offense Exception: The CIMT exception applies and bars removability, if your maximum

    penalty for the crime does not exceed one year in prison and you were not sentenced to a term

    of imprisonment of more that 6 months.

  2. Crime committed Under 18 Years of Age. This exception applies to those who

    committed a crime of CIMT while under 18 years of age and that crime was more than

    5 years before your application for admission.

CRIME INVOLVING MORAL TURPITUDE (CIMT): Defined as crimes which are "inherently base,

vile, or depraved, and contrary to the accepted rules of morality and the duties owed between persons

or to society in general". These include but not limited to, aggravated assault, kidnapping, arson,

sexual abuse (even if it did not involve a minor), malicious destruction of property, bribery forgery,

criminal possession of stolen property, theft, or fraud (such as welfare fraud).

 

RELIEF FROM REMOVAL: After the court has determined that you are removable, you may

be eligible for relief from removal. There are two types of relief.

  1. Cancellation of removal for lawful permanent residents; You may apply for cancellation

    of removal if you meet the following criteria:

     

    1. You lived in the United States continuously for 7 years after you were admitted and

      before being served the NTA or committed an offense that is subject to removal on

      inadmissibility grounds

    2. Have been a legal permanent resident for 5 years

    3. Have not been convicted of an aggravated felony

    4. You have not been granted cancellation of removal or waiver under 212(c) of the

      Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

    5. You are not a terrorist, crewman, or exchange visitor

      After you satisfy these requirements, if the positive factors in your life outweigh the negative,

      the judge may decide to grant relief.

212 (c) WAIVER Congress eliminated this form of relief in 1996. It was replaced with cancellation of

removal. However, you may still qualify for 2I2(c) Waiver if you meet the following conditions:

  1. You are a legal permanent resident and you pled guilty to a crime (except a firearms offense)

    before April 24,1996.

  2. You have lived in the US for 7 years

  3. The negative factor in your life are outweighed by the positive ones

    However, you may be ineligible for this relief if you served 5 years or more in prison for one

    or more aggravated felony convictions.

CANCELATION OF REMOVAL FOR NON-LPR'S: You may be eligible for cancellation of

removal if you are an LPR but a refugee, asylee or an unauthorized and undocumented non-citizen

if you meet the following criteria:

  1. You have had physical presence in the US continuously for at least 10 years

  2. The time that is counted toward the 10 years stops when either you commit a removable offense

    or ICE serves you the NTA when you have committed a criminal offense which makes you

    removable under the Immigration and Nationality Act Section 2I2(a)(2)

    (To explain further, if the government serves an NTA on you or you commit a removable offense under INA212(a)(2) within 10 years or your arrival in the US you will be ineligible for this form of cancellation).

  3. You must be able to show that you have never been absent from the US for more than 90 days

    on one trip or more than 180 days in combined trips.

  4. You must be able to show you were a person of good moral character during the 10

    years prior to your application.

  5. You must also have a US citizen or LPR spouse, child or parent and that your departure

    from the US would cause family members extreme unusual hardship.

ADJUSTMENT OF STATUS: You may be able to adjust your status to a LPR. This is used in

certain, very limited circumstances. This can work even if you are already a LPR. To adjust your

status, you will need a relative or employer to petition for a visa on your behalf. The spouse or

child of a USC or the parents of a USC over 2l years old are immediately eligible for a visa and

not subject to waiting periods. Otherwise, the Visa's are given according to certain preferences based

upon the family relationship. The preference categories are as follows:

 

    1. First, Single (+21) child of USC

    2.  A. Spouse, unmarried (-21) child of LPR

         B. Unmarried child (+21) of LPR

    3. Married child of USC

 

Note; Only LPR's that entered with a visa and who overstayed or certain Cuban parolees

are eligible for this form of relief. Otherwise, there is no way for a person who entered illegally to

adjust their status (except for those who had an I-130 or I-140 visa petitioned on their behalf that

was filed before April 30, 2001.)

 

2I2(h) WAIVER: You may be eligible for a waiver pursuant to Section 212(h)of the INA.

This applies to criminal convictions of CIMT or Prostitution or if you have a single marijuana

possession involving less than 30 grams of marijuana. To be eligible for a waiver pursuant to

Section 2I2(h) of the INA, you must meet the following criteria:

  1. You have not been convicted of a drug offense other than a one time simple possession

    of 30gms of marijuana.

  2. If your crime was prostitution and it was committed more than l5 years ago, you will

    need to show that you have been rehabilitated.

  3. For crimes committed less than 15 years ago and did not involve prostitution, you will

    need to show that you have a spouse, parent, son, or daughter who is a US citizen or

    in the country legally and denial of your admission would result in extreme hardship to

    your qualifying relative.

  4. You are a legal permanent resident and you have lived in the US for 7 years before your

    immigration case started.

  5. You have not been convicted of a aggravated felony.

OTHER FORMS OF RELIEF such as Asylum, Withholding, Convention Against Torture (CAT)

Cuban Refugee and Nicaraguan Adjustment, Central American Relief, Temporary Protected

Status (TPS) and Deferred Enforced Departure may also apply to some individuals.

 

DETERMINING WHETHER YOU MEET THE STANDARDS FOR RELIEF:

  1. Application: When the judge decides you are eligible to apply for relief, he will give you

    the proper form and allow you some time to get your application completed. There may

    be a fee but you may ask for a fee waiver by explaining your need. Be sure and take

    care in filling out your application and be completely honest with your answers. You will

    be required to swear to it's contents. If you are not truthful, the judge may deny your

    application on those grounds. After submission of your application, the judge will

    grant you time to prepare for your case.

  2. THE INDIVIDUAL HEARING: This hearing is your opportunity to submit your

    evidence proving that you meet the requirements for relief. The type of evidence

    you need to present will depend on the type of relief you are seeking.

FACTORS THAT THE JUDGE CONSIDERS: The judge will weigh the positive and negative

factors about your life. Some of the positive factors to be considered are:

  1. Family ties within the US: Documents such as birth certificates, marriage licenses,

    US passports or naturalization certificates, copies of family green cards, family

    photos and letters from family members.

  2. Long Term Residence in the US: Leases or mortgages, telephone, cable and electric

    bills.

  3. Evidence of Hardship to Family Members: Records of family members who depend on you

    such as medical, psychiatric or educational disabilities. Testimony or letter from a spouse showing

    that you provide financial and emotional support for your children.

  4. Evidence that you have a medical condition or disability such as medical or educational

    records.

  5. Reports about your country such as human rights and economic conditions. These

    document may be in the form of US State Department reports, and or newspaper

    and magazine articles discussion the status of your home country.

  6. Service in the United States Armed Forces such as discharge papers commendations,

    and VA benefit statements.

  7. History of Employment: Letters from your employer, pay stubs and W2 forms.

  8. Ownership of Property in the US such as mortgages and bank statements indicating

    such ownership.

  9. Tax History: Print out of tax filing from the IRS and copies of as many years back

    as you can of tax statements filed.

  10. Proof of Rehabilitation: Letters from counselors, therapist or your sponsor and

    certificates of attendance and completion of drug or alcohol rehab programs.

  11. Community Service information such as letters from churches, clergy, sports

    groups indicating your participation.

  12. Any Other Information that may exist of your good moral character.

NEGATIVE FACTORS: This includes your criminal history unemployment history lack of

payment of taxes, violations of immigration laws or any evidence of bad character.

 

YOUR TESTIMONY You must supply details regarding your application. Your life will be

an open book. You will need to include details about work history medical history alcohol and drug

abuse, rehabilitation, education, family and marital history as well as detail about your arrival in the

US. If you are asking for relief in the case of asylum, withholding or CAI, you must supply details

about the events of abuse or torture.

 

THE JUDGE CANNOT RECONSIDER YOUR GUILT: The immigration judge has no authority to

reconsider your guilt. If you plead guilty to a crime it is better to take responsibility for the crime

and show the judge that you will not commit another crime in the future. It is important to show

mitigating circumstances such as drug use and that you have been rehabilitated since the crime, or that

you did something that you realized was a stupid thing and that you regret it.

 

TESTIMONY OF OTHERS: Witnesses may be called to testify of your good moral character, the asset

you are to your community, your good family relations and the importance of your being present

for your family and that they know about your convictions and why they do not want you to be

deported. However, do not call any family or friends that are not in the US legally because they

then may be detained for removal proceedings.

 

THE JUDGE'S DECISION: The judges decision will be issued either in writing or oral immediately

after the hearing, at a later date, or by mail to you and or your attorney. If you win, you will declare the

judgment final, however, if you lose, you will tell the judge that you reserve the right to appeal the

decision.

 

VOLUNTARY DEPARTURE: If the judge issues a removal order you will not be able to reenter

the United States for a certain period of time. You may want to consider a voluntary departure.

The advantage is that you will not have a removal order. This is important if you someday hope

to reenter the US. However if you were in the country more than 180 days, voluntary departure

may not help you reenter the United States. You also can not get voluntary departure if you

have been convicted of an aggravated felony or have a prior removal order. In order to get a

voluntary departure you must show the judge that:

  1. You have a valid travel document

  2. The means to buy a one-way open ticket to your home country.

If granted a voluntary departure the judge will give you a certain amount of time to depart the US,

usually 30 days if you are in detention. If you request VD prior to the end of the immigration

proceedings the judge can give you a maximum of 120 days to depart. If you make your request

at the end of the proceedings you can get a maximum of 60 days to leave. Also, you must show

the judge that you have been present in the US one year before the NTA was filed and that you have

not been convicted of any crimes for five years and have been a person of good moral character.

 

FAILURE TO DEPART AFTER GRANTED VOLUNTARY DEPARTURE: If you do not depart as

agreed, the VD becomes a deportation order and if you are apprehended by ice you will not be able

to see a judge. You will be deported.

 

UNLAWFUL PRESENCE: If you entered the US unlawfully since April I, 1997 or have overstayed

your visa, you may begin to accrue "unlawful presence". After 180 days of unlawful presence you may

receive a three year bar from admission to the US and if you accumulate one year of unlawful presence

you will receive a 10 year bar from the United States. This unlawful presence does not begin to

accumulate until you turn 18 years of age.

 

POST ORDER CUSTODY AND RELEASE FROM INDEFINITE DETENTION: The government

has limited period of time to physically remove after the order of removal is issued. The general

rule is 6 months, however if ICE fails to remove you, you may be released on parole. If so you

will be required to report to ICE periodically. When the circumstances change and ICE is ready to

remove you, you will be sent a "bag and baggage" order requiring you to report to ice on a specific date.

 

If you are still in ICE custody 90 days after your final order of deportation, a review will be done

by your DO (deportation officer). During this custody review your DO will determine how likely

it is that ICE will be able to remove you within a reasonable length of time. If it seems unlikely that

ICE will be able to remove you in a reasonable amount of time ICE should release you. However,

few people are actually released after this 90 days.

 

After 180 days, there will be a review done by the Detention Unit at ICE in Washington DC.

If ICE determines that there is not a likely removal within a reasonable period of time, you may be

released on parole. There are several factors that are considered for release on parole. They are

as follows:

  1. IS THE COUNTRY TO WHICH YOU ARE TO BE REMOVED LIKELY TO ACCEPT

    YOUR REMOVAL IN THE NEAR FUTURE. If the delay is because of bureaucratic

    conditions in your country it is unlikely you will be released. However, if the delay is

    due to war or if it does not have a repatriation agreement with the US (such a/Cuba), you

    will have a good argument for release.

  2.  IF YOU HAVE COOPERATED WITH THE REMOVAL PROCESS: If you fail to

    cooperate with your DO (Deportation Officer) by not providing him with necessary

    information, you may be denied parole. Also, if the DO reports that you have in someway,

    interfered with your removal, you may be denied parole. You will need to provide to your

    DO all requested information or if you do not have all these documents, then you will

    have to provide sufficient information for your DO to provide to your country's consulate so

    that a travel document can be issued. Common documents would be birth certificate, passport,

    or other identity documents from your country. Failure to provide this information may

    be considered a failure to cooperate.

  3. FLIGHT RISK: Your will need to provide your DO with an address where you will

    reside after your release and/or a job that you will report to after your release. If you

    do not have this information, it may be determined that you are a flight risk or unlikely to

    report as required.

  4. DANGER TO THE COMMUNITY: You will need to prove that you are not a risk to

    your community or anyone else. You can do this by arguing that your crimes were not

    crimes of violence or by providing the evidence that you have been rehabilitated.

NOTE; The federal government can refuse to release you if they find special circumstances

exist such as you have a highly contagious disease, you are mentally ill, or your release would have

serious adverse foreign policy consequences or security or terrorism concerns.

 

BARS TO REENTRY: After an individual has been removed from the US, his reentry is barred for a

certain period of time, depending on the circumstances of removal.

 

  1. Removed on inadmissibility grounds (except controlled substance offense)

  2. Removed on deportation grounds (except aggravated felony)

  3. Excluded or deported under old law

  4. Two orders of removal

  5. Failure to attend removal proceedings

  6. Removed for an aggravated felony or controlled substance

  5 years

10 years

10 years

20 years

  5 years

Permanent

ILLEGAL REENTRY

If you reenter the US illegally after you have been removed and you are re detained, you may be subject

to criminal prosecution. You could be sentenced to as much as 20 years in prison.

 

 

The materials available at this website are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain advice with respect to your particular situation. The opinions expressed at or through this site are the opinions of the individual author and may not reflect the opinions of this company or any individual employee.